Freephone 1800 200 233

encsdanlfrdegaitnoptruessv
Forest Establishment – Planting a Forest – Forestry Development & Maintenance with Green Belt
Forestry Services

Forestry Services (19)

Below is a list of Grants and Schemes available to people looking to invest in forestry. Green Belt can assist you with any of the applications so please get in touch if you have any questions.

Forest Road Scheme
This scheme provides opportunities to forest owners to improve access to forests. Forest roads provide additional biodiversity opportunities in the forest by increasing open spaces and forest edge effect.
Read More

Afforestation Grant and Premium Scheme
The Afforestation Grant and Premium Scheme provides a package to encourage planting of forests by compensating forest owners towards the costs of forestry establishment and for the income foregone during the maturation of the timber crop.
Read More

Premium Payment
premium sheet imagePremia are payable only in relation to plantations which qualify for an Afforestation Grant. Applicants must be over 18 years of age. The Scheme has two rates, the Farmer Rate and the Non-Farmer Rate of premium.
Read More

Woodland Improvement Scheme
This scheme has been amended to limit funding for woodland improvement work associated with tending and thinning of young broadleaves planted post 1980. Funding may also be provided where brashing is required to facilitate manual application of fertiliser where aerial fertilisation is not possible.
Read More

Native Woodland Scheme
The Native Woodland Scheme (NWS) is aimed at protecting, enhancing and expanding Ireland's native woodland resource and associated biodiversity, through appropriate planting and management.
Read More

 

How often a thinning is carried out can be established by your Green Belt forester. The frequency of thinning is a balance between making the operation profitable while maximising the value of the remaining crop. For example; thinning operations are carried out every three years on fast growing spruce.
Your Green Belt forester can find the best market for your thinnings.In conclusion, thinning is an essential part of your farm forestry investment. If thinning is planned or carried out incorrectly, your plantation will suffer. If carried out correctly your plantation will continue to be a healthy crop and investment.

Once the type of thinning has been agreed, the thinning intensity is worked out. The amount of timber removed is dependent on the species of tree and the rate at which it is growing. The calculations involved are somewhat longwinded but the general idea is to remove the right amount of timber to make the operation profitable without adversely affecting the productivity and stability of the remaining trees.

There are a number of steps involved in the practise of thinning. The first step is to make/cut inspection racks through your plantation. These racks are basically pathways through the plantation, where a forester can inspect the trees form and establish the growth rate of the trees. Once the growth rate of the trees has been established, your forester can recommend the type of thinning which should be carried out.

The first thinning of a plantation is usually carried out when the trees have reached at least 8m in height or in terms of age of the plantation, between 12 and 20 years old for a fast growing species such as spruce and 20-30 years for other species. The decision to thin is often a compromise between waiting until the thinnings are large enough to maximise your return and not delayed so long that the growth potential of your remaining trees is affected by competing growth.

Thinning is the removal of a proportion of the trees in a crop. (In a typical Sitka Spruce plantation, less then 20% of the initial stocking is left at clearfell). By removing smaller weaker trees the remaining trees are left with more light and room to grow to their full potential. The trees which are removed can be sold to make a variety of products such as fence posts, paper, pallets or MDF.

native-woodland-establishment-schemeThe Native Woodland Scheme (NWS) is aimed at protecting, enhancing and expanding Ireland's native woodland resource and associated biodiversity, through appropriate planting and management. Where compatible, the scheme also encourages the growing of quality hardwood. The NWS is implemented by the Forest Service of the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries & Food, in partnership with Woodlands of Ireland, National Parks & Wildlife Service (NPWS) of the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, and the Heritage Council. The scheme comprises two separate elements: Conservation (focused on protecting and enhancing existing native woodland) and Establishment (focused on creating new native woodland).

Green Belt Downloads

This scheme has been amended to limit funding for woodland improvement work associated with tending and thinning of young broadleaves planted post 1980. Funding may also be provided where brashing is required to facilitate manual application of fertiliser where aerial fertilisation is not possible.

Green Belt Downloads

Green Belt currently manages in excess of 300,000 acres of private forestry in Ireland for private clients, investors and pension funds. Green Belt are always at the coal face of forestry promotion, in regular contact with local councillors and TD's to maintain the planting grants and premia which are essential to the continuance of afforestation in Ireland.

Thinning & Harvesting
thinning-harvestingIf your forestry plantation is approaching 20 years of age, it might be ready for first thinning. This is an essential maintenance procedure for forests and it will enhance the future growth and production of your plantation towards clearfell.

Read More

Wood Chipping Services
wood-chip-supplyGreen Belt set up Irish Wood chipping Services in 2008. The company currently have several Jenz chippers capable of chipping up to 65t/hour combined. Irish Wood chipping Service chip on contract and also buy, chip and sell forest material from the forest estate.

Read More

Timber Marketing
timber-marketingMarketing is the process of selling timber to obtain its true fair market value. Here are the key points that a woodland owner should consider when marketing timber. Achieving a reasonable financial return on a timber investment depends on many factors. None is more critical, however, than proper marketing. Even if financial gain isn't the primary goal, proper marketing can reduce the cost of achieving other management objectives, such as creating wildlife habitat.

Read More

Forest Establishment
forest-establishmentOnce the objectives of the new forest have been considered and species to be planted selected, it is time to begin the practical side of the site development.

Read More

Page 1 of 2

Quick Contact

Fields marked with * are required

NewsLetter Signup